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Deferred Application Advice

Posted by: Website Administrator on 1/7/2014

You may have recently received a defer decision from one of your early application colleges, and you might be wondering what that means, and what you can do about it. This blog post should clear a few things up, and help you plan for the future.

What does it mean that my application was deferred? If your application was deferred it means that for any number of reasons, the admissions office chose not to give you a final decision in December. The college will re-review your application in the spring, and give you an updated admissions decision along with the rest of the Regular Decision applicant pool.

Why was my application deferred? That’s very difficult to say, as every college defers applicants for different reasons. Instead of focusing on why your application was deferred, it’s more important to look forward to what you can do to potentially improve your chances of admission in the next round.

So what should I do? The first thing you should do is send a friendly and polite e-mail to your area admissions counselor telling them that you’re still very interested in the school, and ask if there’s anything that would be helpful for you to send them. Sometimes, they might have a very specific request, so it’s important to ask. For example, they might just want to see how your fall semester grades turned out. They might also have specific advice about what you should and shouldn’t do to increase your chances of admission. If there’s nothing specific that they need from you, here are some ideas for you to strengthen your application.

  • Send a short, sincere, and specific letter or e-mail of interest to your area admissions counselor. Let them know you are still interested in the school and why.
  • Ask if you can have an interview (if you haven’t had one yet). Many colleges will not allow deferred applicants to interview, so don’t be discouraged if this is not an option for you.
  • Ask the admissions office if paying them a visit would be a good idea (if you haven’t already visited). Some schools care about demonstrated interest, and a visit could be something they would note.
  • If you feel that perhaps your test scores are a bit weak for the college, you can sign up to take the SAT or ACT again and send the college your new scores.
  • If you’ve had any significant extracurricular or academic accomplishments or achievements since submitting your application, you can send your area admissions counselor an update.
We recommend asking the college before doing anything beyond these suggestions. You want them to know that you’re still interested, but you don’t want to do too much. A few well-written lines can have more impact than an overload of information. There’s no guarantee you’ll be admitted, even if you follow the admissions office’s instructions to the letter. So you should think positive thoughts, and look forward to the admissions decisions you’ll be getting in the spring from all of the colleges you applied to.

Expert Admissions Class of 2013 College Acceptances

Posted by: Website Administrator on 4/24/2013
Congratulations to the Expert Admissions Class of 2013!

We are proud to share the results from Expert Admissions’ Class of 2013. Our students have been admitted to 74 different colleges and universities in 25 states, Washington DC, and Scotland. Our acceptances include Ivy League universities, top liberal arts colleges, public flagship universities, and many other types of institutions.  

View Our Complete List of Acceptances
 

Advice for Accepted Students

Posted by: Website Administrator on 4/10/2013

By now, you’ve probably heard back from most, if not all, of the colleges you applied to. You may not have been offered admission everywhere, but you’ve probably got a few acceptances under your belt. As May 1 approaches, here is our advice for how to handle your college acceptances.

1) Celebrate! You worked hard, and deserve all of your success.  

2) Prepare to be recruited. When a college admits you, they want you to enroll, and they will do their best to make you feel wanted. Expect invitations to visit campus and phone calls or letters from current students; some schools will even send you t-shirts, scarves, or posters. Take advantage of opportunities to meet with students, spend the night in a dormitory, and don’t be afraid to ask the tough questions.

3) Visit campus. Many colleges have programs just for admitted students. These programs often include specialized facilities tours, opportunities to attend classes, panels with current students, faculty, and administrators, an overnight stay in the dorms, and the chance to meet hundreds of your potential future classmates. Even if you can’t go to an admitted student event (or don’t want to), you can still have a productive visit. Be sure to let the admissions office know you’re an admitted student, and ask what you can do while you’re on campus. 

4) Focus on the schools to which you were admitted. You may have been offered a spot on a waitlist or two, and they may be schools that you’re really excited about. That’s okay. Let those schools know you’re still interested, and accept the spot on the waitlist. However, you most likely won’t be hearing back from them until after May 1, and you’ll have to submit an enrollment deposit somewhere by then, so focus your energy on the schools that admitted you. Those schools are excited about you, and would love for you to attend! Boost your ego and spend some time with people who think you’re awesome. 

5) Keep up with your schoolwork! Don’t think that just because you’ve been admitted to college that you can stop doing well in school. Colleges still need to see your final transcript, and they can rescind admission offers if your academic performance drops significantly.

6) You can change your mind. You may have had your heart set on College X since fall of junior year, and thrilled to have been offered admission, but maybe you developed a great rapport with a current student at another college, or College X’s admitted student program was less than thrilling. It’s really okay! You have until May 1 to submit an enrollment deposit, so feel free to take that time to figure out where you’ll be happiest. Remember – you want to make the best decision for you and your family, and not necessarily the decision everyone expects you to make.

Congratulations on your acceptances, and best of luck in making your decision!

Waitlisted? What's Next?

Posted by: Website Administrator on 4/3/2013

Getting put on a waitlist feels strange. You put so much effort into your application, all of this pressure and expectation builds up, and after all of that, you're told you still have to wait. If you've been placed a waitlist, you might be wondering, “What’s next?” 

Every college has its own policy, so be sure to check in with colleges you're waiting on. It's perfectly acceptable to call and ask how the waitlist is ordered (if at all) and managed, and to ask what you can do to increase your chances of admission. You might also want to read the waitlist offer letter carefully, as colleges will sometimes include helpful advice in the letter itself. Some colleges also provide advice for waitlisted students on their admissions office website or blog. It’s worth checking what resources are provided by the college that waitlisted you.

Some schools have students arranged numerically, while others have students grouped in tiers. Others have no ranking system at all: if they need to go to their waitlist, they review whoever is on it at the time and go from there.

Regardless of how the waitlist is structured, if you want the best shot at being admitted, be sure to follow-up appropriately with the college(s) you're interested in. In most cases, this means officially accepting the waitlist offer, and sending an email or letter to your regional admissions counselor letting them know you’re still interested. Beyond that, policies vary widely. Some colleges will allow waitlisted students to visit or have an interview. Other colleges discourage waitlisted students from visiting, and don’t allow interviews. Before planning anything, or arranging a visit, be sure to call (or email) and ask what’s appropriate.

Few colleges are able to make any movement on their waitlists before May 1, the Universal Reply Date – so patience is key. And remember that you have to submit an enrollment deposit by May 1, as well. With that in mind, once you have accepted the waitlist offer, and followed up with your admissions counselor, it’s best to focus on the schools to which you’ve been admitted.  

Deferred Application Advice

Posted by: Website Administrator on 1/14/2013

You may have recently received a defer decision from one of your early application colleges, and you might be wondering what that means, and what you can do about it. This blog post should clear up a few things, and help you plan for the future.

What does it mean that my application was deferred? If your application was deferred it means that the college didn’t deny your application, but that for any number of reasons, they were not prepared to give you a final decision in December. The college will re-review your application, and send you a final decision in the spring, along with the rest of the Regular Decision applicant pool.

So what should I do next? The first thing you should do is send a friendly and polite email to your area admissions counselor telling him or her that you’re still very interested in the school, and would like to know if there’s anything that would be helpful for you to send them. Sometimes, they might have a very specific request, so it’s important to ask. For example, they might just want to see how your fall semester grades turned out. They might also have specific advice about what you should and shouldn’t do to increase your chances of admission. If there’s nothing specific that they need from you, here are a couple of things you may want to consider to strengthen your application.

  • Send a short, sincere, and specific letter or email of interest to your area admissions counselor.
  • Ask the admissions office if you can sign up for an interview (if you haven’t already had one). Some colleges don’t allow deferred applicants to interview, so don’t be discouraged if this option is not available to you.
  • Ask the admissions office if they think paying them a visit would be a good idea (if you haven’t already visited). Some schools care about demonstrated interest, and a visit could be something they care about.

If you feel the need to do anything beyond these suggestions, we recommend holding off, or asking the college if it would be okay. You want them to know that you’re still interested, but you don’t want to do too much. A few well-written lines can have more impact than an overload of information. Remember – there’s no guarantee you’ll be admitted, even if you follow the admissions office’s instructions to the letter, so you can be optimistic, but it’s best not to focus on it too much.

Then, you should look forward to the admissions decisions you’ll be getting in the spring from all of the colleges you applied to.  

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